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Sound Design
(Scroll down for samples)
 

Since the addition of sound to film about a century ago, there have been some very creative people who have done some very amazing manipulation of sound.  Wikipedia offers a very interesting history of 'sound design' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_design) which refers all the way back to prehistoric times.  As fascinating as that is, I don't think anyone in the film, TV, or music communities was using the term 'Sound Designer' with its current meaning until the early 1980's.
 
It was at that time that Warren Dewey, Bill Koepnick, and Joel Valentine were amongst the first five people to get their hands on Emu's Emulator II ... the first sampling keyboard that had audio quality sufficient for use in professional audio and music.  I credit these guys as the creators of the art now known as Sound Design. 
 
Through an interesting twist of fate, Warren had engineered the album my band Serenade recorded for RCA, and his wife at the time, Molly Hansen, had once hired me as a recording engineer at Salty Dog Recorders in Van Nuys.  I had no idea they had met and married, and hadn't seen either of them for a while.  One night over dinner, Warren said that he was overloaded with animation and advertising audio work, and asked Molly: 'Who do we know who is a keyboard player, a recording engineer, and can be trusted to work in our home late at night while we're sleeping?'  Molly suggested me, and Warren believed I had the chops ... so they hunted me down.  Fresh off a messy divorce, I was all too willing to dive in ... and I became (what I consider to be) the fourth Sound Designer.
 
There were no sequencers (except for a primative one built into the E2).  No digital worstations.  No Pro Tools or Performer or anything like that.  We loaded sound banks from big floppy disks, then performed the sound effects via the keyboard and recorded straight to 16-track tape synchronized to 3/4" video.  That's right ... performed live!
 
As time went on, Warren taught me a great deal about audio and sound effects for TV, advertising, and film.  We worked on shows like Gobots, Voltron, Transformers, the list goes on and on ... literally thousands of shows.  I, too, branched into advertising work, and we also had a long run producing music together for TV and radio commercials, mostly national spots.
 
Soon I began taking an E2 to music sessions, where people were fascinated by its capabilities.  Everyone asked: 'What is this Sound Design?  Is it just sound effects?'  Word soon spread, and people began to admire the art.  Eventually, many people got on board ... and now there are thousands of people who call themselves Sound Designers.  Some are.  Some aren't.  It takes more than a Pro Tools rig to be an artist.
 
Speaking of Pro Tools ... Warren and I met the Digidesign folks in the company's infancy.  We beta-tested their software for them.  We also investigated all the DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations) as they were being developed.  We had an AMS Audiophile for a while ... it crashed a bunch.  We checked out Lexicon's Opus, and quite a few others.  Warren went with New England Digital's PostPro, which was expensive and tricky but quite powerful. Eventually, Pro Tools conquered the market ... and here we are today ... all god's chillin' is Sound Designers!
 
I've done a megatonage of Sound Design over the years.  You can get a sense of my credits by visiting my Audio Post page (http://www.bravermania.com/audiopost.html) or by checking my IMDB credits (http://imdb.com/name/nm0106028/).
 
On this page, I'm posting a few examples.  Interestingly, sound designers don't often get copies of their work to exhibit like this ... so I'm starting with just a few.  I'll round up some others and post them soon.
ENJOY!
 
 

 Disclaimer:
For the sole purpose of exhibiting my sound design.
Copyrights remain with respective owners.
 
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Turn up the volume!
 

Dead To Rights
(Sound Design, Foley, Remix)

Dead To Rights
deadtorights.jpg
(NAMCO)

Gordon Hookailo of GDH digital (http://gdhdigital.com) hired me to do sound design / sound FX and Foley for the intro cinematic (FMV) for NAMCO's 'Dead To Rights' videogame.
 
As it happened, Gordon was scheduled to vacation in Fiji immediately following his mix, so he asked me to be on call should anyone ask for any changes.  Well ... they did.  So I wound up remixing this.  It was mostly Gordon's mix ...  I just lowered the FX a bit and boosted the music as they requested,  and a little tweak here & there.


 
 

Qwackerz Trailer
(Sound Design, Mix)
 

Qwackers_Witch.jpg

Qwackers_Duck.jpg

Qwackers_Babe.jpg


 
 

Cat & Mouse
(SFX, no music)

Tom & Jerry Blast Off To Mars
TJMars2.jpeg


 
 

Cat & Bat
(SFX, no music)

The Batman
Batman.jpg
Emmy Winner Sound Editing


 
 

BoKu Logo
(Sound Design / Music / This Mix)
 
BōKU is a boutique online company specializing in the absolute highest quality certified organic, vegan, and kosher super food products.  Visit the BoKU website by clicking on the BoKU logo below.

Click this pic to visit
BoKU.jpg
the BoKU site


 
 

Bionicle*Mask of Light
Bionicle63m.jpg
MPSE Golden Reel Winner: Best Sound Editing

Here are a few video clips of 'dream' sequences from the MPSE Golden Reel Award winning Bionicle: Mask Of Light ... I did the sound design/SFX for these.  They are unmixed, SFX only.


 
 

Capcom Demo (Resident Evil)
(Sound Design, Foley Record/Edit, This Mix)
 

Resident Evil Demo
CapcomDemo_ResidentEvil.jpg
Capcom

This was my audition piece for Capcom.  This led to Capcom hiring me to do some sound design for Dragon's Dogma.  I mixed this version to feature my sound design and the Foley I recorded and editied.  No music.


 
 

Click this pic to visit
Machinima.jpg
the Machinima site

Here are a few video clips of sound design I did for GDH Digital and Machinima.  These sometimes racy spoofs poke fun at various popular video games.  They sometimes contained fictitious logos and entertaining levity (often with chickens ... I was asked to edit in chicken clucks instead of beeps to censure 'fowl' language).  These are snippits I selected to feature my sound design, and are not final mixes.

"Impressive Run"

"Plankway"

"Average Tool"

"Albion Ink"


 
 

Heritage Steinbeck
(Sound Design & Mix)

Click this pic to see
steinbeckheritage_large.jpg
Heritage Steinbeck


 
 

YooHoo & Friends
(Audio Supervision, Sound Design, Mix)
 

yoohoo_02.jpg

YooHoo_CN.jpg

yoo-hoo-520-1.jpg

This show was a fun reunion with director David Feiss, with whom I had done Cow & Chicken and I Am Weasel.  These clips are from early in the 52-episode series when I did the sound design.  The SFX are a tad loud in these early mixes ... which is fine for my purposes here :)

 

Music by Rich Dickerson & Gigi Meroni ... Click on their logo to visit their website:

RichGigi_Logo.jpg

"YooHoo & Friends Main Title"

The YooHoo & Friends Back-Story

"Sugar Babies" Opening

"Sugar Babies" Epilogue w/End Credits

TSR Audiogames

(Samples coming soon!)


Terror Trax 'Track of the Vampire'
TerrorTraxVamp.jpg
(TSR)

'First Quest'
firstquest.jpg
(TSR)
'Karameikos'
Karameikos.jpg
(TSR)
'Red Steele: The Savage Coast'
RedSteel.jpg
(TSR)

Terror Trax 'Track of the Werewolf'
TerrorTraxWW.jpg
(TSR)

'Hail the Heroes'
HailTheHeroes.jpg
(TSR)
'Ravenloft: A Light in the Belfry'
Ravenloft.jpg
(TSR)
'Night of the Vampire'
NightOfTheVampire.jpg
(TSR)

'Glantri'
msglantri.jpg
(TSR)

'Planescape'
Planescape.jpg
(TSR)
'Mark of Amber'
MarkOfAmber.jpg
(TSR)
'Red Steele: Savage Baronies'
RedSteelSavageBaronies.jpg
(TSR)

Oh yes ... Back in the days when videogames were almost exclusively in arcades, Gordon Hookailo (http://gdhdigital.com) hired me to work on these 'Audio/CD Games' by Dungeons & Dragons manufacturor TSR.  I handled the sound design/editing, and shared the mixing duties with Gordon.  He would mix the dialogue, then I would mix the music, then we'd both mix the FX.  I supervised, spotted and mixed the Foley, and on some of these I supervised the recording of the dialogue. 
 
Most notable was Gordon's foresight regarding Pro Tools!  These were done when PT was in its infancy, and my AKAI DD1000 was far superior!  The DD1000 was portable (PT was fragile and could barely be moved!) and it did time expansion/compression far more gracefully than PT.  Yet Gordon saw the future ... the inevitable connection between audio post and the home computer.  I give him props for that!  He also had an 8-fader JL Cooper fader pack ... the first to interface with Pro Tools.  We took turns doing our respective mixing duties.  What a trip!

Bravermania * Phone: 818-425-4421